FINE ARTS WORK CENTER
IN PROVINCETOWN

Fantastic Worlds In the Realest Poems: How Fantasy Fiction Might Help Our Hardest Realities Bloom

Gabrielle Calvocoressi Poetry August 6 to August 31, 2018 TUITION COST: $500 CLASS SIZE: 15 SESSION: summer LEVEL: 4 week asynchronous workshop
What does it mean to tell the truth? And why can it often be so hard to do and/or make the poem seem nothing like the vivid, hallucinatory world of joy/sorrow/daily life?

In this class we will read Fantasy Fiction by writers such as Zen Cho, Ursula Le Guin, JY Yang and others as a means of thinking about “fantasy” and world building in our own work. We will write poems and make maps and catalogues and histories. In short, we will move deeply into the magical and often extraordinary business of everyday life and write poems that truly see the world in every dimension. This class is an experiment and a workshop and a reading group. Everyone is welcome on this journey.

BIOGRAPHY

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia EarhartApocalyptic Swing (a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize), and Rocket Fantastic, winner of the Audre Lorde Award for Lesbian Poetry. Calvocoressi is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including a Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lectureship from Stanford University; a Rona Jaffe Woman Writer's Award; a Lannan Foundation residency in  Marfa, TX; the Bernard F. Conners Prize from The Paris Review; and a residency from the Civitella di Ranieri Foundation, among others. Calvocoressi's poems have been published or are forthcoming in numerous magazines and journals including The Baffler, The New York TimesPOETRYBoston ReviewKenyon ReviewTin House, and The New Yorker. Calvocoressi is an Editor at Large at Los Angeles Review of Books, and Poetry Editor at Southern Cultures. Works in progress include a non-fiction book entitled, The Year I Didn't Kill Myself and a novel, The Alderman of the Graveyard. Calvocoressi teaches at UNC Chapel Hill and lives in Carrboro, NC, where joy, compassion, and social justice are at the center of their personal and poetic practice.